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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 65 (some duplicates have been removed)
at north when he was offered a job at boston university. but he continued to flash back to the south. he took part for example and freedom summer in 1964 and flew back any number of times in order to attend some of the strategy sessions. but it is true that once the movement began against of the war in vietnam that he also felt very strongly about that and his energy began to divide, you know, she never forgot about the black struggle or ceased to have full sympathy with it. but the demand on his time tended to be more in regard to the vietnam. >> host: before we talk about what he did in opposition to the war we can talk about him getting fired from spearman college. this is an interesting episode of his life and it is certainly related to the civil rights that he did. what was going on at spellman at the time? >> guest: spellman had a black president at that time named albert manly, and it's only since the book has come out as a result of the conversation with someone. i've changed my perspective and he and so vividly howard and his family were packed up in the summer of 1963 ready to
was at boston university where he also butted heads with john silver. >> guest: that's right. >> host: and that went over the course of decades that he was there, is that correct? >> guest: yes. yes. silver, who died recently, i was just told -- i'm forgetting by who, some publication had assigned silver to review my biography of howard zinn. [laughter] you know, i was -- i can't say i was pleased the man had died, but i was certainly pleased he hadn't reviewed the book, because he would have hated it. [laughter] i very much in the book do take howard's side of things. i mean, silver was such a deeply-dyed conservative that on some issues it's even fair to call him a reactionary. and he loathed howard. and he had the board of trustees at boston university entirely under his thumb. and the chair of the board was a man at least as conservative as sillber himself. and so he and howard just went at each other over practically everything. >> host: uh-huh. maybe now we can turn back to the vietnam war. what were some of the sort of first activities that howard was finding himself involved w
a scriptures to unite or divide? author and professor of religion at boston university, steven, joins us. president obama, act two, the president calling for unity, but hitting at divisive liberalism. what will the republicans do? congressman gomert joins us. progressive claims. this is flo. i need you. i feel so alone. but you're not alone. i knew you'd come. like i could stay away. you know i can't do this without you. you'll never have to. you're always there for me. shh! i'll get you a rental car. i could also use an umbrella. fall in love with progressive's claims service. lou: house republicans trying to pressure senate democrats to pass a budget. for the first time in almost four years. now, the republicans have up vailed a bill to suspend the debt limit with a vote set for as early as wednesday. details of that legislation include this -- suspension of the debt ceiling for three months. on the 19th of may, the debt limit increases from $16.4 trillion to accommodate addional raring the treasury requires r and bills withholes the pay of lawmakers if congress fails to pass a budget
a job at boston university come but he continued to fly back to the south. he took part in the freedom summer in 1964 and flew back in the number of times in order to attend strategy sessions. it is true that once the movement began against the war in vietnam that power also felt very strongly about that and his energies begin to divide. he never forgot about the black struggle or ceased to have full sympathy with it. the demands of his time tended to be more and more in regard to the war in vietnam. >> host: before we talk more about what he did in opposition to the war we can't talk about and getting fired. this is an interesting episode, and it is certainly related to the civil rights work that he did. what was going up the tab? >> guest: of black president at the time. and it is only since the book is come out as a result of a conversation with someone that i have changed my perspective of the fact that the black president and howard table so often and finally so bitterly. there were packed up in the summer of 1963 ready to go to boston for the summer. he stopped at the mailbox for
. researchers at boston university pioneered the study of cte. they found the disease in 18 of 19 brains of former nfl players they examined. our next guest is the co-director of boston university's program, chris liwienski. he played football at harvard university and has his own history of concussions from his pro wrestling days. >> and making his way to the ring, 260 christopher liwienski! >> it all starts with my wrestling career. i actually have some of my concussions captured, which is nice. >> what is he doing? >> i had depression problems. i had short-term memory that was terrible for a year and a half. i kept sleepwalking for three and a half years and needed medication. i had headaches for five. that's when i decided maybe there was something wrong with my brain. >> joining me tonight, chris liwienski, co-director of the center for study of cte at boston university and author of "head games: football's concussion crisis." chris, great to have you with us tonight on the program. how many athletes in all contact sports do you think are suffering from cte? >> oh, we can't actually
firm of santos and urrutia. my daughter is a graduate of boston university. she works for the san francisco international terminal marketing division. born and raised san franciscans. i want to encourage everyone out there listening that this is the best city to raise a family. regarding a few of those articles that you read about families leaving san francisco -- don't. stay in the city. this is what can happen to you if you stay. [laughter] in terms of my dedication, i think, san francisco has embraced me, has welcomed me, has allowed me to prosper, allow me to raise this incredible family. as a naturalized u.s. citizen, i tell you i have learned a great deal about compassion, public service, and it is time for me to give something back to a community that has embraced me and opened their arms to me. [applause] and that is what i intend to do as a new trustee. you may have heard that i have an unusual work schedule. i open my office every morning at 5:20 a.m. i have an open house for anyone that want to come to my office to talk to me, hopefully, about engineering, until it o'cl
years ago. her mother, sybil, a swimming star at boston university. >> this is probably the first time sloane's gone into a season saying, "i can't wait to get out there and play." >> reporter: sloane's big breakthrough came last year in the french open and wimbledon, and on the pages of "vogue" magazine, which named her one of its up and coming "style stars." and yesterday, it was her style on the tennis court that drove serena williams to frustration. now having conquered her one time idol, sloane now has somewhat of a new perspective. >> this is so crazy, but -- oh, my goodness. i think i'll put a poster of myself now. >> reporter: ron claiborne, abc news, new york. >> and so a star is born. by the way, after the big victory, none other than shaquille o'neal congratulated her on twitter, saying, "when you defeat a legend, you become a legend. keep it going." thank you so much for watching. we're always working for you at abcnews.com. "nightline" later at its new time, 12:35 a.m. eastern. and i'll see you again tomorrow. good night. >>> tonight wall street's reaction to the news from
university, professor of religion, five years. boston university, professor of religion, eight years. chairman of the department of religion, one year and currently. newspapers and magazines, contributor to "new york times" magazine, journal," slate.com, salon.com. author, three books on religion include ""american jesus," how the son of god became a national icon." hobbies: painful, of the boston red sox, diehard fan, a passion which introduced him to, quote, grand theologal themes that would later preoccupy him including why a good god would allow such an evil team as the new york yankees to win so many world series, unquote. besides baseball, tennis. stephen richard prothero. >> stephen richard prothero, your father is also a physician, is that right? >> that's correct. >> did he see the motion picture by mel gibson? >> he did. >> what did he have to say about that? >> he found a real human being wouldn't survive 20 minutes into the movie because it's so violent, there's such brutality is brought on on jesus' body and not realistic from a medical perspective. >> meaning he would
ended dr. king's papers. there are several peepers in boston university. how are the papers that you edited -- >> guest: they're all very different. the papers line editing, the papers at boston, the papers in atlanta, the papers and so many different places, hundreds of archives around the world. i found papers in india. we bring them all together and decide how to publish them and make them available to people. that's been my job for the last 25 years. >> host: do ra history and african-american, i can see your interest. what really brought you to want to do this? his wife asked you, but what was your motivation for wanting to do it? >> guest: i had a lot of doubts when she called and asked because i didn't know if i wanted to devote the rest of my career to doing this. >> host: how did she ask you? >> guest: she asked me if i would be interested in and when we first talked on that phone call i said are in their other people that have done more work really on the grassroots dimension of the struggle, not so much on the role. i've never really written very much about came apart from
to know you hearing your comments. you edited dr. king's papers. there are people is in boston university where you went to school and other papers. how are the papers you edited different? what did you find? >> guest: the peepers i'm editing, the papers at boston, the peepers and atlanta, the papers and so many different places, hundreds of archives are none of the world. i've gone -- i have papers in india. so we bring them all together and we decide how to publish them and make them available to people. that's been my job for the last 25 years. >> host: ury history in coming your african-american. i can see an interest. what brought you to want to do this? coretta asked you but what was your motivation for wanting to do it? >> guest: i think i didn't want to not do it. i didn't know wanted to devote the rest of my career to do this. >> host: how did she ask? >> guest: she asked are you interested and when we first talked people that have done work really on the grassroots dimension of the struggle not so much on the role i never knew much about him apart from the movement. so, but then
or your comments. you have edited dr. king's papers. there are papers from boston university where he went to school and there are other papers. how are the papers are you it is different? what did you find? >> guest: there is many different. the papers of boston in the papers of atlanta and the papers in so many different places, hundreds of archives around the world. i found king papers in india. so you bring them all together and you decide how to publish them and make them available to people. that has been my job for the last 25 years. >> host: you are a historian and your african-american. i can see your interest. what really brought you to want to do this? coretta his wife, his widow asked you about what was her motivation for wanting to do at? >> guest: i think i didn't want to not do it. i think it was more -- i had a lot of doubts because i didn't know of wanted to devote the rest of my career to doing this. >> host: what did she say to you? how did she ask you? >> guest: she asked whether i would be interested in actually when we first talked on that phonecall i said aren't ther
, thank you. i'm a history student at boston university. i'm very interested in the opportunity for a breakthrough with relations with iran. when i look at the middle east today and they were going on across the middle east, i see a few big,, two of them and the u.s. relationship with saudi arabia. this is a two-part question. at the feature opinion on the proxy throughout the middle east, both in military terms and for influence in on the question of energy. that's a possibility of the two pillars solution, using saudi arabia and iran for the middle east if they sin if that's possible, as the potential expansion of u.s. domestic energy production open a door to an energy solution? thank you. >> the notion of the proxy works. i think i understand what your saying. i think i'd use different vocabulary for that and this gets into the issue of the relationship with saudi arabia. what's going on right now in the middle east and saudi arabia, afghanistan and a number of points in its modern history is basically using the promotion of a particular sort of fell off the islam, we tend t
with more than 300 employers that include harvard university, and fenway park home to the boston red sox. we start with a preshump-- presumption that all the young men and women who are coming to our high school need to connect with the economy in a way that works for them, their families, and for the businesses that need to grow here in our city. >> education experts say getting students to focus on potential careers early and outlining clear connections to the relevance of school will help curb the dropout crieses going forward. according to the pick boston's push to hire students has helped increase high school graduation rates in the city by 11% over the past five years. >> but neil sullivan admits the real battle begins in high school classrooms like ali-- at boston latin academy, he teaches daniel rodriguez anatomy and physiology. >> if you ask them to list the jobs available they will list doctor, lawyer, teacher, you know, the sort of obvious. they don't understand the wealth of opportunity in boston or just in any one field. the challenge i think is getting more students to apply, t
at boston university we would fiscal but there are other papers. how are the papers that you edited different? what did you find? >> guest: the papers i am taking, the papers of boston, the papers at atlanta, the papers of some at different places, hundreds of archives around the world. i've gone, i found papers in india. so you bring them all together and you decide how to publish them, make them available to people. that's been my job for the last 25 years. >> host: you've lived in this town. you're a history. you're african-american. can see your interest. what really brought you to want to do this? carranza, ma his wife, ask you, his widow, asked you what was your motivation for wanting to do it? i think i didn't want to not do it. i think it was more -- i had a lot of doubts when she called and asked because i didn't have the wanted to devote -- >> host: how did she ask? >> guest: she asked wha whetheri would be interested in actually when we first talked on the phone call i said on to other people done more work? my work and then really the grassroots of the struggle not so mu
at boston university pioneered the study of cte. they found the disease in 18 out of 19 brains of former nfl players they examined. currently, there is no study linking cte to suicide. but unfortunately, six nfl players have ended their lives in the last two years alone. the facts are clear. cte is a dangerous disease affecting nfl players. every year players get bigger, they get faster, they hit harder and their equipment, their technology and equipment is hard to keep pace with the game. the nfl needs to take meaningful action to prevent cte in its players. junior seau had a terrific career and will go down as one of the greatest linebackers of all time. it's important we learn from his death to prevent further tragedies in the future. tonight in our survey i asked you, would you send your kids to school with armed teachers? 12% of you say yes. 88% of you say no. coming up, the oscar nominations are out, and controversy is abound. film critic david edelstein joins me. stay with us. ♪ [ male announcer ] how do you turn an entrepreneur's dream... ♪ into a scooter that talks to the cloud?
at boston university. i'm very interested in the opportunity for a breakthrough with relations to iran. but when i look at the middle east today and i look at a proxy war going on across the middle east, i see a few big problems, two of them being the u.s./israeli relationship and also the u.s. relationship to saudi arabia. and this is a two-part question. first, i'd love to get your opinions on the proxy war going on throughout the middle east both on military terms and for influence. and on the question of energy, does a possibility of a two-pillar solution using both saudi arabia and iran for security in the middle east exist, and that's possible -- if that's possible, does a potential expansion of u.s. domestic energy production open a door to a numbering solution? -- to a energy solution? thank you. >> i think the notion of a proxy war, i think i understand what you're saying. i think i'd use a different vocabulary from that. and this gets into the issue of the relationship with saudi arabia. what's going on right now in the middle east is that saudi arabia, as it has done at any
-term consequences with chronic encephelopathy, 33 of the first 34 players that we've examined at boston university school of medicine were positive for the disease, so we have a lot of concerns, this is pretty widespread at the professional level, and we've also found it in athletes as young as 17 playing football. the biggest concern we have is about children. >> chris, let me ask why is it happening now? everybody has a theory, right, the game is being played faster and harder, the guys are bigger. do you have an analysis, is it the science for detecting this better, why are we focused on this now, why weren't we 20 years ago? >> we've never looked for it before. congressman pascrell has been a real leader on this and doing it before it was cool, but only in the last few years have we been able to see this disease in football players, because we started looking for it. now everywhere we look, we find it. the issue is just now we know it exists and is widespread, we have to move forward. it's impossible to ignore, especially when you kind of can see the physical damage in these injuries, see the
institute at boston university. gives lectures on university. he told the guardian, nobody asked who is she? where did she live? not one reporter doug deep. the lack of legwork is a total surprise to me. let's bring in our all female "news watch" panel. judith miller, a pulitzer prize-winning investigative reporter and a huge football fan. kirsten powers columnist for "the daily beast". both are fox news contributors. i kid obviously. judy doesn't know anything about football. >> true. jon: you know a lot of about journalism. what about this? should editors have to ask these questions. >> i have to agree with the public opinion editor of "the times." look, you don't ask reporters to corroborate what you assume to be basicfact. here was a guy weeping on television at loss of his girlfriend. it kind of strains credulity for people to think, oh, my gosh, maybe this girl friend never existed? why would you think assume that unless you think the football player is a sociopath. jon: that is the thing, everybody says, i mean the sports director got up there at notre dame. he started weeping at the
to tau. >> reporter: robert stern, a cte expert at the boston university school of medicine, is a bit more skeptical. he says small's brain scan doesn't just measure tau, it measures another protein called am ma amel oichlt chlt dichlt which is present in all timer's disease. >> we don't know if its he tau or both. >> reporter: could the players be suffering from cte, always timer's or did other disease? so as you can see, the study is far from conclusive. but if it does pan out, if could give us a better idea of what cte looks like, how it progresses over the years and maybe even how to treat it. dr. small who you just met in the piece there has done a lot of work in the world of alzheimer's, and he wonders if some of the same interventions could also work for cte. reducing stress, improved diet, anti-inflammatorie anti-inflammatories. it will be a while before can he test the hypothesis, but that's what dr. small and lots of others are angling toward. >> boston researchers recently studied the brains of 35 desaysed football players. 34 of the 35 brains showed evidence of cte. >> a l
mother, a swimming star at boston university. >> this is probably the first time sloan has gone into a season saying i can't wait to get out there and play. >> reporter: sloan's big breakthrough came last year at the french open, at wimbledon and on the pages of "vogue" magazine, which names her one of its up and coming style stars. and it was her style on the tennis court that reduced serena williams to frustration. now having conquered her one-time idol, sloan has somewhat of a new perspective. >> this is just so crazy. but oh, my goodness. i think i'm going to put up a poster of myself now. >> reporter: ron claiborne, abc news, new york. >> and just a few hours ago, sloan stevens played in the semifinal match. >> while stevens hung tough, she couldn't put il out in the end. she dropped the first set, but came back strong in the second. after a now very controversial ten-minute break during which she left the court saying she had medical issues, stevens was defeated. about that ten-minute break, she admitted her chest felt tight and she couldn't breathe and that's why she left
at the university of massachusetts in boston. then a new york times exposÉ on the factory in bangladesh that killed at least 111 people, the factory that was contract with walmart. we will be back in a moment. ♪ [music break] >> this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman with juan gonzalez. our guests are kavita krishnan, secretary all in the women association, one of the the organizers in a protest in the aftermath of the rape and that of a young woman student on a moving bus in delhi. also joined by elora chowdhury, and this as a professor of women's studies at the university of massachusetts in boston. >> i want to bring elora chowdhury into the conversation. your reaction, not only to the massive protests in india, but to the way the media in the west has been covering events there the level of hypocrisy in terms of the fascination with the specifics of the terrible attack that occurred? > yes, i have been following the media reports both in south asia and in the u.s. and u.k. and the so-called western world about coverage of this event. i think what
. >> it was just a matter of timing when to tell my family. >> a few months ago he sent the papers to boston university. for him it's all about giving back to the game, making it safer for future generations including his son, should he follow in his dad's footsteps. dr. sanjay gupta, cnn, reporting. hey! did you know that honey nut cheerios has oats that can help lower cholesterol? and it tastes good? sure does! ♪ wow. [ buzz ] delicious, right? yeah. it's the honey, it makes it taste so... ♪ well, would you look at the time... what's the rush? bee happy. bee healthy. with clusters of flakes and o's. oh, ho ho... it's the honey sweetness. i...i mean, you...love. sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great businesses deserve great rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or
] >> steve: if that wasn't enough, she's also a college student from boston university. she's the cellist. her next big challenge, looking for love. joining us right now, the newly crowned miss universe, olivia culpo. good morning to you. >> good morning. >> steve: there is a headline in the daily news of new york, out of this world, miss universe, olivia culpo, is looking for a dinner date. >> it's not true! >> steve: okay, never mind. >> alisyn: let's clarify. you do not have a boyfriend. >> no. >> alisyn: but you're not actively looking for one? >> no. this job is enough. >> brian: exactly. >> right? i don't think i have enough time. >> alisyn: i'm sorry, floor crew. you can all take two steps back. >> but don't make me look ugly. >> brian: absolutely not. so you're miss usa and thinking, i have reached the zenith of my life. what could top this? the answer is miss universe. when did you think that was possible? >> never. 15 months ago was my first pageant ever. rhode island, the smallest state in the union, just off a whim, i had never done packagents, never followed them. so to be he
.c. berkeley, university of pittsburgh, for a year i was at the hebrew university at jerusalem and currently at boston unive >> you have? >> yes, indeed. >> i got my degree in '79. >> you're the professor of the appreciation of scripture, you've been doing that for what? >> since '90. >> for nine years. three books to your credit? >> that's true. >> i notice that you retreated from some of your statements from your first book, "jesus of nazareth, king of the jews." what changed in the 11 years between the publication of these two books. >> my first book was "from jesus to christ." and that was published in 1988. and "jesus of nazareth" was published a few months ago. what changed is time elapsed, i continued to work in the field and learned more. >> isn't it the all-important question of why jesus was killed, you now believe he represented a limited threat to public order during the festival of passover rather than a major threat to roman rule? >> i don't think anybody thinks he, including pileate that jesus represented a major threat to roman rule. >> well, then why was he crucified? >> bec
in junior seau. the fact is in boston university we started to bring over 34 former nfl players and all but one had this disease. this is pretty widespread if you played a lot of contact sports. >> chris you have uniyour own experience with this you got concussions whether you wen you football player. one ended your career. what was your experience with this. >> yeah, summer of 2003 wrestling for wwe i got kicked in the head. i didn't think it was a big deal even though i blacked out and forgot what we were doing. for five weeks i wrestled through severe headaches got so bad i had to retire. for five years i had severe postconcussion syndrome. today i am not the guy i was and i don't know if i will be dealing with cte in the future. i know it's not unlikely. >> it's terrifying. >> ers hasn't the staptement frm the nfl. the finding under scores the recognized need for additional research to somebodying sell rate the full understanding of cte. they committed a $30 million research grant to the nih. we have work to do and we are doing it. do you think the nfl is doing the work necessary? >
participates and pommeled. we also learn that the boston tea party was not universally celebrated. in the issue of the gazette we read the town minutes of a immediating where they label the boston tea party illegal, unjust and dangerous. i learned that came close to happening on multiple occasions weeks and months prior to april 19, 1775. one case in particular that is covered in the book is how close it came to happening four months prior in new hampshire. also along paul revere lines i learned he went on multi. rides. one in particular the ride to philadelphia and back to share the result. -- another interesting tidbit this time in the british newspaper was printing of the decoration of independence. the arrival of the decoration of independence was on august 10, 1776 in london. three days later the london chronicle prints the equivalent of a tweet today. the they have declared war against great britain. they chronicle the full tax of the decoration. here is the january 23, 1777 issue. i mentioned this earlier. it's printed in boston. it was the front page account of george washington crossin
being seized by other participants and pummeled. we also learned the boston tea party was not universally celebrated. the february 1774 issue of, we read the minutes from marshfield, massachusetts at the meeting were they label the boston tea party illegal, unjust and dangerous. the shot heard round the world. that came very close to happening on multiple occasions weeks and months prior to april 19, 1775. case in particular covers for is how close we came to happening for spire in new hampshire. also along paul revere lines, i went to an multiple revolutionary guys. one case in particular was his right to philadelphia and back to share the south oak results to the intolerable acts, which feared for its accounts by mr. paul revere. another interesting tidbit was printing of the declaration of independence, a rival of the declaration of independence on august 10, 1776 and 19. three days later the london chronicle prints 18th century equivalent that we have advice received at the congress resolved the fourth of july and have declared against great britain. two issues lat
that question to our guest. first here is her distinguished profile. >> born boston. 60 years of age. husband, francis j cross um. one child. harvard university ratcliffe college. bampt a. tough university md. couple laddy. georgetown and tust universities school of medicine instructor in pediatrics, 3 years. the permanent medical group. multiple leadership roles including chief of pediatrics and associate executive director. 29 years all together and currently. hobbies, hiking. sharon levine. >> sharon levine, we are joined by vicki got lick, senior policy attorney for the center of medicare advocacy. are thru? >> i am. good morning. >> vicki, do you have thoughts on what we've been saying so far about the cost implications of by lodgics versus traditional drugs or any aspects of the conversation thus far? >> i have a lot of conthoughts about your conversation. cost is a very important factor and cost very often will cause the population not to be able to afford the drugs. even if they have drug coverage for a biopharmaceutical, very often the copayments are so high that people can't afford
-old father of two served. he was a graduate of duke university and northeastern university of school of law in boston. senator cowan will join the recently appointed south carolina senator tim scott in the united states senate where they will be the first two african-americans to serve in the senate at the same time. governor patrick explained why he chose mr. cowan for the senate today. >> he has been a valued ally to me, and the people of the commonwealth. in every step he has brought perspective, wisdom, sound judgment and clarity of purpose. >> and lieutenant governor tim maury added this. >> he is cool, tom brady, george clooney, james bond, the president have nothing on mo. >> really? i'll let you be the judge. >> there is no greater calling than to be able to go and serve the people of massachusetts, to give back to a state that has given so much to me. >> barney frank, who made public his desire to be the appointed senator and was the only person the governor could have appointed who could start the job at full speed and full effectiveness on friday released this statement. i know m
penn state university with allegations of a cover-up. sandusky maintains his innocence. >>> the city of boston is under a state of emergency because of the flu outbreak. this flu season is shaping up to be one of the worst in decades. emergency rooms in boston are flooded with people complaining of flu-like symptoms. the city already has 700 cases including four deaths. the number of cases is already up tenfold from last year's flu season total. >> we're seeing a huge increase in patients coming in with the nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, upper respiratory infections with the fevers and cough, body aches. >> in southeast virginia, hospitals in the hampton roads area are urging all patients and visitors to wear masks while in the facilities. the best advice doctors are urging is to get the flu shot now. flu season can sometimes last into april. >> got to protect yourself. >> yeah. >>> 4:37 the time. ahead on "news4 today," the state of the commonwealth. what virginia's governor considers his top order of business as state lawmakers get to work. >>> and police ask for your help after a sec
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 65 (some duplicates have been removed)